Tag: green power


The following is a word from our founder about our new Renewable Integration Service Evaluation.

Dear Friends:

I am writing to tell you about an exciting new energy advisory service now available through RPD.

It’s called RISE, or Renewable Integration Service Evaluation, and it offers corporate electricity buyers a 90 day fixed- price no-obligation review of their options for buying physical renewable electricity.

We designed this product to provide companies with a timely, cost-effective way to cut through the confusion that often surrounds the decision to “go green” and get straight to the bottom line.

The Origin of RISE

During the last three years, RPD has gained a wide range of experience in serving the corporate market for renewable electricity. We have worked with data centers, warehouse businesses, hospitals, big box retailers, universities, and grocery chains all across the country. We know the options, from on-site installation to off-site power purchase agreements (real or virtual). From direct access products to green tariffs to fractional energy contracts to community solar and more.

We understand what is involved in buying wholesale versus retail, and the various regulatory rules that apply to different state and regional electricity grids.

In short, RPD has a deep first hand knowledge of the renewable electricity business as a commercial player, and not simply as a consultant or a policy advocate.  We think that gives RPD and its professional staff – which together have over 80 years of power sector experience – a leg up on many other energy advisers.

So as more and more companies begin to look for the best way to green their electricity spend, we thought this was a good time to begin sharing our knowledge with as many businesses as possible.

What is RISE?

Let me add one final note: RPD is offering RISE as an independent, no-obligation service. RISE is not affiliated or backed by any renewable developer or supplier and is technology neutral.

RISE is also customer-driven and can be used to evaluate any physical renewable energy options selected by a customer, whether or not they include any product offered by RPD.

In short, we want RISE to work for you. I hope you’ll take the time to see if RISE makes sense for your business by following this link.

Kind regards,

Greg Staple

Founder and Chairman, RPD

We are proud to share some exciting news about RPD’s growing commercial success.

2016 was transformative for RPD: our innovative medium-term contracts for slices of physical renewable energy plus RECs won significant new backing from major corporate buyers.

At year’s end, RPD’s total sales of green electricity topped 200,000 MWh with energy committed to customers from a diverse mix of renewable facilities in the mid-Atlantic states (PJM), Texas (ERCOT) and California (CAISO). The total value of the energy and RECs covered by RPD’s contracts is now over $7 million.

In 2016 we also opened a new sales office in Houston and recruited a top-flight management team with decades of energy industry experience: Eric Alam, our CEO; Mark Mancino, our VP of Sales, and Mike Adcock, our VP of Supply. This new management team has already put RPD on the map.

RPD has now established itself as the leading national provider of fractional green energy capacity to commercial and industrial customers from large renewable power installations. In 2017, we plan to accelerate our growth because we know that the great majority of corporate buyers do not need (and cannot afford) to contract for the output of an entire utility-scale wind or solar facility.

So please help us get the word out about RPD’s alternative green energy contracts. Follow us and link to us through our social media outlets on LinkedIn, Facebook, and Twitter; we will continue to share news and market information as the year unfolds.

Happy New Year!

The record level of voluntary renewable power buys by corporate America could significantly help many states, such as Texas, Oklahoma, Illinois and North Carolina, that have considerable coal-fired generation, meet the greenhouse gas (GHG) reduction standards mandated under the EPA’s new Clean Power Plan (CPP).

The EPA’s Plan adopts state-by-state guidelines for reducing CO2 emissions from existing power plants — reductions must be roughly 32% below 2005 emissions by 2030, on average — but leaves it up to each state to decide how best to meet these standards. States may adopt a mix of strategies, including greater use of lower carbon generators (such as natural gas-fired power), more efficient plants, and expanded use of renewable generation, such as wind and solar power, which are also eligible for special federal incentives.

Although the EPA’s new mandates apply directly to the public sector — that is, to individual states and certain generators subject to EPA regulation — the rules are designed to impact the mix of power used by private consumers (business and households) and, thereby, the total volume of GHG emissions associated with U.S. electricity generation.

Thus, the more emission reductions that the private sector can achieve in any given state through voluntary action — by installing on-site solar or by changing to electricity suppliers that only deliver renewable power — the easier it may be for that state to meet its obligations under the CPP. In other words, while the Clean Power Plan does not say much about this, demand-side consumer initiatives, as well as supply-side actions, can make a significant contribution to reducing overall power sector carbon emissions. And corporate PPAs have begun to show the way.

That was evident earlier this Summer when a flurry of announcements from companies like HP and Amazon, pushed long term corporate purchase commitments for renewable power over the 1,500 MW mark, already exceeding last year’s record level of business deals for green power.

Corporate and Industrial Green PPAs

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As we wrote in an April post, falling prices for renewable power and rising corporate sustainability goals are leading more Fortune 500 businesses to directly buy green electricity.

While terms for these PPAs vary, the seller typically develops, owns, and operates the renewable facility, and the buyer agrees to purchase the plant’s output at a negotiated price for an agreed term (typically 15 to 20 years). The size and type of long term commitment required for these deals have put off many prospective renewable power buyers, however.

At RPD, we believe that all business customers should be able to access the benefits of direct green power purchases. That is one reason why RPD developed medium term (3-10 year) PPAs for green power. RPD can offer shorter terms and smaller volumes by sourcing power from a mix of existing and new facilities that are not fully subscribed. RPD’s arrangements still help to finance additional renewable projects but they don’t require the customer (i.e., the end user of the power) to foot the whole bill for each project. The costs are spread over several off-takers.

Please get in touch if you’d like to learn more about how RPD can help your company switch to green power.